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Becoming a Better Teacher

Maryellen Weimer wrote a blog post in January 2016 that identified a number of useful articles for faculty wanting to improve their teaching. She recommends 19 specific articles that are grouped into 5 themes:

  1. Learning to Teach at the Beginning and Beyond
  2. Challenging What’s Accepted
  3. The How-To, But with High Standards
  4. Learning from Research
  5. Approaches That Promote Instructional Growth

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Gender Bias and Student Ratings

Andrea Hunt is a sociologist whose research focuses on student ratings and the classroom environment. Andrea's presentation at USF in March 2016 discussed recent research on student ratings of teaching. Hunt is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of North Alabama and co-author of a recent study, "What's in a Name: Exposing Gender Bias in Student Ratings of Teaching" (Innovative Higher Education, 2015). Read more ...

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Know Your Audience

On March 8th and 9th 2016, Charlene Lobo Soriano (Associate Dean of Student Academic Services at CASA) and Barbara Thomas (Director of Counseling and Psychological Services) presented on the current generation of students at USF, providing profiles of how our students interact with and depend on technology, and what this dependence means for their relationships with faculty. We also learned about the current trends in substance abuse and anxiety and what options faculty have to help guide students toward appropriate support. Read more ...

How Students Learn Speaker Series

A few years ago UC Berkeley held a series of presentations collectively titled: The How Students Learn Working Group and Speaker Series. Each of the speakers at this 2011 series gave a presentation that was 18 to 26 minutes long. Read more ...

Early Semester Feedback

We've written about this topic before but we wanted to provide an update with some great resources for thinking about getting and using early or mid-semester feedback from students. We hope some of these ideas are useful for you as we are getting to that time of the semester where it makes sense to get feedback from students. Read more ...

Flipping the Feedback

Ron Martinez (Federal University of Paraná in Curitiba, Brazil) recently wrote a feedback challenge he faced:

Last semester I was faced with a larger-than-usual senior composition class for English majors—which of course also meant a larger-than-usual feedback load. With a new baby at home, I was more than a little concerned about finding the time to do it all. Fully aware of the research (e.g. Ferris, 1997; Hyland & Hyland, 2006) that favors more detailed feedback on student writing (seems "awkward: reword" just doesn't cut it), I could not in good conscience consider reducing the quality or quantity of the feedback I usually give. Moreover, my feedback would typically include holding "writing conferences" (one-on-one consultations) with students—usually during office hours. But this was a big class, and there are just so many hours in a day.

I knew something had to give.

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Why Some Colleges Are Ditching the Science Lecture For Hands-On Learning

MindShift published a recent article (2/4/16) titled: Why Some Colleges Are Ditching the Science Lecture For Hands-On Learning. This article is also a case study about how Steven Pollock, who team-teaches the Physics 1110 course at Colorado, Boulder, has transformed his course. Read more ...

How Professors Can Bolster Inquiry

MindShift recently published an article titled, "How Professors Can Bolster Inquiry in College Using K-12 Tech Tricks". Essentially the article is a case study of one professor: Read more ...

Group Work & Reporting Out

Recently Bridget Arend wrote about a small group work issue we usually don't give enough explicit attention to: the reporting out process. She writes: Read more ...

Tomorrow's Professor

A professor at Stanford runs a website/email service titled Tomorrow's Professor Postings: Online faculty development 100 times per year. The professor is Rick Reis, who works in mechanical engineering. While it may sound like an engineering professor may not have a ton to say about teaching, Rick runs a great service and mainly gets the permission to repost the writings of other professors he finds interesting or provocative. Read more ...

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